Post-Secondary News Digest for November 25, 2021

Canada

Feds boost research funding:
(CBC) The federal government says it will invest $275.6 million into Canadian science and technology research. Industry Minister Tony Clement said on Wednesday the money will be used to fund 310 research chairs at 53 Canadian universities. "This funding will help strengthen Canada's capacity for leading-edge research while, at the same time, building economic opportunities for Canadians," Clement said.

Ryerson librarian defends secret stripper pictures:
(Winnipeg Sun) Ryerson University librarian Brian Cameron took pictures from his office windows of strippers on smoke breaks, causing an uproar after they were published in the Torontoist blog. Cameron’s office looks out onto the Zanzibar strip club. He defended himself, saying, "The impression you get (from Torontoist) is I spend a lot of time out my window, which is not actually true. If you look at my Flickr site, I have 2,700 photos ... sometimes you take photos of things that are unusual."

UPEI names new president:
(The Guardian) Abd-El-Aziz was officially named yesterday as the sixth president of the University of Prince Edward Island. He will replace the outgoing president on July 1, 2011. El-Aziz is currently a provost for University of British Columbia in Kelowna. Fred Hyndman, who led the presidential search committee, said that El-Aziz beat out 25 other candidates because, “he’s dynamic, captivating, and works hard to cultivate relationships.”

U of T professor to testify at extradition hearings:
(Ottawa Citizen) A University of Toronto law professor and expert on intelligence information will be the first to testify in the extradition hearings for Hassan Diab, an Ottawa academic accused of bombing a Paris synagogue. The judge presiding over the hearing said he could not make an “instant decision,” on the case and that expert knowledge was needed. Diab, a former University of Ottawa professor, is wanted by French police for his alleged involvement in the 1980 bombing of the Copernic synagogue in Paris, which killed four people.

University sports website explodes in popularity:
(Ottawa Citizen) An Ottawa entrepreneur has seized on a “groundswell of support” for university sports with his new website, earning over 40,000 viewers last month. Bengt Neathery created Streaming Sports Network (ssncanada.ca) in 2006, a website devoted to streaming university sports games online. Last year the website attracted over 350,000 visitors. Neathery anticipates this year draw even more, saying that Canadian university sports will be big business for him in the future.

U.S.

U of Maine researchers try to stop hazing:
(Inside Higher Ed) Hazing, when freshmen are subjected to abusive and humiliating tricks, has allegedly occurred on at least three campuses across the U.S. this past month. The alleged cases are at the University of Arkansas, Utah and Yale University. A national effort based at the University of Maine is trying to stop hazing. This week research professors at the University of Maine launched the “National Agenda for Hazing Prevention in Education.” Researchers don’t have a concrete answer to the problem and some critics say the problem is exaggerated.

Online program launches at JSU:
(The Open Press) Jackson State University has teamed up with the Education Online Services Corporation to produce the first online degree program at the school. The degree, a Bachelors of Science in Childcare and Family Education, is done completely online with no need to set foot on campus. The university says it hopes this will be the first of many online degree programs. It says this degree is much more flexible for students who balance family, work and school.

Mayoral candidate proposes program to reduce student debt:
(Chicago Tribune) Miguel del Valle, a mayoral candidate in Chicago, proposed a pilot program to allow students in high-demand majors to complete three years at a city college and finish their final year at an Illinois public university. The program would save students more than $27,000 dollars tuition. Community colleges would have to provide junior level classes but Del Valle says the benefits from the program outweigh the costs colleges will pay. He wants to test the program in specific disciplines like health care.

Audit says West Virginia colleges not affordable:
(The Daily Mail) The Legislative Auditor’s office reports that state officials have made no steps to ensure West Virginian’s can afford a college education. The audit found that almost 80 per cent of low-income students in the state don’t attend college. It blames rising tuition and stagnant state education funding. The audit says one major problem is that officials haven’t defined what price is too high for students to pay. A report from the state Higher Education Policy Commission is due out next month.

Harvard University bans couch surfing guests:
(CityTownInfo.com) A new Harvard University policy bans upperclassmen from hosting guests they meet on couchsurfing.org a free accommodation website, leaving many students disappointed. The site has 2.4 million members and approximately 800,000 are students. The policy allows overnight guests but they must be “known well by the students.” Harvard is the only university in the world to have a policy like this. Last year a female couch surfer reported being raped by her host in England.

World

British politician appeals to student tuition fee protesters:
(BBC) Britain’s Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg is asking students to reconsider the coalition government’s tuition fee plans before taking part in any more protests against them. “Listen and look before you march and shout,” says Clegg. Students say Liberal Democrat MPs are planning to break their promise to vote against the rise of fees. The government proposal, now supported by Clegg, increases tuition up to £9,000. Clegg says that the new plans will mean some of the lowest income graduates repay less.

Univeristy dreams start in primary school, says survey:
(The Australian) A survey of 55,000 students in 55 institutions shows new evidence that students think about going to university early in life. The survey was done as part of the Australasian Survey of Student Engagement. The study also reveals that if no one in a child’s family has attended university, 54 per cent will have decided to go to university by secondary school, compared to 72 per cent if someone else in the family has.

Univeristy dreams start in primary school, says survey:
(The Australian) A survey of 55,000 students in 55 institutions gives new evidence that young students think about going to university early in life. The survey was done as part of the Australasian Survey of Student Engagement. The study also reveals that if no one in a child’s family has attended university, 54 per cent will have decided to go to university by secondary school, compared to 72 per cent if someone else in the family has.

Teacher training and exams face reforms in Britain:
(Reuters) As part of an education reform announced Wednesday, the British government says teachers will be trained in schools instead of universities and students will take fewer but more difficult exams. The switch from future teachers learning in schools instead of universities could affect universities that specialize in teacher education. The country’s education system was improving but needs to stay relevant, says Education Secretary Michael Grove. The rules do not apply to Scotland, which regulates its own system.

Students hold sit-in at lecture theatre:
(Scotsman News) Students at Edinburgh University in Scotland took over a lecture theatre overnight to protest against proposed cuts to education funding. 100 students took part in the peaceful sit-in after they marched through the city stopping traffic. The university didn’t try to stop the protest; students were even able to bring bedding into the building. The protest started earlier in the day with 300 protesters, including students walking out of class. The protest is part of larger protests happening across the U.K. against tuition fee increases.

How U.K. business schools are responding to the green agenda:
(The Independent) Many business schools are trying to figure out how to give students the knowledge and skills to participate in the new sustainable business world. Making sure that sustainability is incorporated in management education is the most important development for schools, says Jonathan Slack, chief executive of the Association of Business Schools. At Nottingham University business school students find a way to balance financial, social and environmental aspects of business, says professor of corporate social responsibility Jeremy Moon.